Victorian Christmas

・Victorian Christmas

Albert duke from Germany who is a husband of Queen Victoria introduced customs of the Christmas tree in U.K. at the first time. In 1840, Queen Victoria and Albert duke brought a Christmas tree into Windsor Castle to cerebrate first Christmas after they marriage. Queen Victoria was born in 1819 and her father is The Prince Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent and Strathearn was a member of the British Royal Family, the fourth son of King George Ⅲ. Her mother is Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, the daughter of Duke Franz Friedrich of Saxe-Coburg-Asslfeld. Victoria became Queen at only 18 years old on Jun20, 1837. The British nation welcomed Queen Victoria enthusiastically as the same time as her became Queen. Many people thought that the kingdom whole families were scandalous before Queen Victoria succeeded to the throne, but they felt majestic dignity in her seriousness. The Queen married Albert duke in enthronement the third year. British people often regard this Royall Couple (The Queen Victoria and Albert duke) as ideal couple. The couple has 9 children and they often enjoyed in the Baru Morand Castle, it is the annual function for their family. In December, 1848, the “illustration lei Ted London news” paper introduced a cut of the Christmas scenery of the Royal Family. The people will know a custom to decorate a tree for the first time. At first, the people of the upper class of the Royal Family imitate this, but infiltrated into the nation widely in 1960-70. 1860’s Christmas of Royal Family is Last Christmas which spend whit Albert duke and it was so beautiful and gorgeous Christmas. In 3 room of the private use of the Queen, Several Christmas trees were hung from the ceiling of the trace that a chandelier was removed and innumerable lights shined to the every corner of the room. Candies and candles as I cannot count it colored some trees and small trees on the desk. And it was placed some presents which the Royal Family gave each other all over the room. Because all the members gave each other it, one had to prepare for 13 presents.

But when did the traditions of Christmas begin? Many of the traditions that we associate with Christmas began in the Victorian era (historic-uk.com, )According to HISTORIC-UK.com (http://www.historic-uk.com/), “No era in history, however, has influenced the way in which we celebrate Christmas, quite as much as the Victorians. Before Victoria’s reign started in 1837 nobody in Britain had heard of Santa Claus or Christmas Crackers. No Christmas cards were sent and most people did not have holidays from work. The wealth and technologies generated by industrial revolution of the Victorian era changed the face of Christmas forever. Sentimental do-gooders like Charles Duckens wrote books like “Christmas Carol”, published in 1843, which actually encouraged rich Victorians to redistribute their wealth by giving money and gifts to the poor-Humbug! These radical middle class ideals eventually spread to the not-quite-so-poor as well.”

It is natural to celebrate Christmas with your family and your friends now. However, there was an age when it had been prohibited to celebrate Christmas in the past. There was time that was not able to celebrate Christmas even in Europe and the United States from about the middle of the 17th century to beginning of the 18th century. It was the prohibitions of all doing of the decoration of Christmas tree and eating Christmas dinner. It became as the present of Christmas when Christmas revived again in the 19th century.

 Is this reference too long??

“No era in history, however, has influenced the way in which we celebrate Christmas, quite as much as the Victorians. Before Victoria’s reign started in 1837 nobody in Britain had heard of Santa Claus or Christmas Crackers. No Christmas cards were sent and most people did not have holidays from work. The wealth and technologies generated by industrial revolution of the Victorian era changed the face of Christmas forever. Sentimental do-gooders like Charles Duckens wrote books like “Christmas Carol”, published in 1843, which actually encouraged rich Victorians to redistribute their wealth by giving money and gifts to the poor-Humbug! These radical middle class ideals eventually spread to the not-quite-so-poor as well.”

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